Present Tense

There are two present tenses. They are present simple tense and present continuous tense.

Present simple tense looks like this:

Do you speak English?

Yes, I do. Howabout you? Do you speak it?

No, I don’t. Well, I speak a little.

Present continuous tense looks like this:

Are you speaking English?

Yes, I am. I am speaking English.

Because if you are speaking English I cannot understand you.

I am not speaking English.

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Click the link to see a list of conversations with present continuous tense.

Listen and read and write down the “present continuous” sentences from the conversations.

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Present simple tense is used to describe habits, customs, seasonal changes, things that occur with regularity.

“I speak English” means generally “I can speak it”.

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Present continuous tense is generally used to describe things or events that are happening now!

I am speaking English. Right now I am speaking it to you.

Comprehension Questions in Present Simple Tense (for Miyako Part 3 Dialogue)

Here are some questions in present simple tense. Listen to this conversation and then in pairs ask each other these questions.

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10 Responses to “Present Tense”

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  1. anbu says:

    Thank u

  2. rr says:

    time waster

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