Present Tense

There are two present tenses. They are present simple tense and present continuous tense.

Present simple tense looks like this:

Do you speak English?

Yes, I do. Howabout you? Do you speak it?

No, I don’t. Well, I speak a little.

Present continuous tense looks like this:

Are you speaking English?

Yes, I am. I am speaking English.

Because if you are speaking English I cannot understand you.

I am not speaking English.


Click the link to see a list of conversations with present continuous tense.

Listen and read and write down the “present continuous” sentences from the conversations.


Present simple tense is used to describe habits, customs, seasonal changes, things that occur with regularity.

“I speak English” means generally “I can speak it”.


Present continuous tense is generally used to describe things or events that are happening now!

I am speaking English. Right now I am speaking it to you.

Comprehension Questions in Present Simple Tense (for Miyako Part 3 Dialogue)

Here are some questions in present simple tense. Listen to this conversation and then in pairs ask each other these questions.


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10 Responses to “Present Tense”

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  1. anbu says:

    Thank u

  2. rr says:

    time waster

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